IEA COMPEX

IEA NAMICO

French-Australian International Emerging Action in Chemistry

IEA COMPEX
2019 – 2021
Contact:

Associate Prof. Marie Guignard
marie.guignard(at)icmcb.cnrs.fr

Introduction

The IEA “COMPEX” (Towards exotic compositions of transition metal oxides used as positive electrode materials for Li or Na batteries) is developed in partnership between the Institut de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Bordeaux (ICMCB) UMR-CNRS 5026, Bordeaux, France and the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. It addresses structural changes at atomic scale during recycling of Li or Na batteries.

Missions and research themes

This IEA project focusses mainly on 4d transition metals exotic compositions that have been poorly studied so far. Our study is focused on structural changes occurring during electrochemical intercalation and deintercalation of alkaline ions in Molybdenum (O3-LixMoO2 et O3-NaxMoO2) and Rhodium systems (O3-NaxRhO2 et P2-NaxRhO2).

institutions and laboratories involved

France

  • Coordination : Associate Prof. Marie Guignard, ICMCB, UMR-CNRS 5026, Bordeaux.

Australia

  • Associate Prof. Neeraj SHARMA, University of New South Wales, Sydney.

Contour tracing of X-Ray diffraction recording upon electrochemical deintercalation of Na in the P2-NaxRhO2 system.

IRP REDOCHROME

IRP REDOCHROME

French-Australian International Research Project in Chemistry

IRP REDOCHROME
2015
Contact:

Frederic Paul,
frederic.paul(at)univ-rennes1.fr

IRP REDOCHROME
News

Introduction

The IRP “REDOCHROME” focusing on redox-active and multipolar organometallic assemblies for photonics and molecular electronics is a joint CNRS-ANU and UWA initiative in chemistry. It focuses on molecular photonics and electronics and involves 24 Australian and French researchers. It is the continuation of a Franco-Australian PICS project initiated in 2015 between French researchers at the Institute of Chemical Sciences of Rennes (ISCR), a joint CNRS-University of Rennes 1 unit (UMR CNRS6226), and Australian researchers at ANU.

Missions and research themes

The main research theme concerns the chemical synthesis of redox-active carbon-rich organometallics and related molecular-based materials. These discrete molecular assemblies are often endowed with remarkable electronic and optical properties. Such assemblies are amongst the most complex systems at the nanoscopic scale and are challenging to model theoretically, a situation which calls for more experimental insight into these paradigmatic molecules. The Redochrom LIA involves French researchers from Rennes (UR1) and Toulouse (UPS) universities and Australian partners located at two top-ranking universities, namely the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra and the University of Western Australia (UWA) in Perth. This group of French and Australian organic and organometallic chemists has additional expertise in spectroscopy, linear and nonlinear optics (LO and NLO) and electron-transfer, and unique instrumentation. The purpose of this LIA is to develop an understanding of these fascinating architectures, so as to permit their use as discrete molecular-based devices in various applications related to photonics and electronics.

MAIN OBJECTIVES OF THE PROJECT

In a continuation of ongoing collaborative projects that link the French and Australian team members, one part of the project is aimed at establishing reliable structure-property relationships for designing (electro-)switchable two-photon absorbers based on redox-active organometallics, which constitute a little-explored class of compounds from the standpoint of their NLO properties. Such materials have potential applied outcomes in all-optical information treatment and other societal uses. A key focus of the Redochrom consortium is to elucidate the role of the metal center(s) on these optical properties.

The second part of the project will progress molecular electronics research beyond two-terminal metal/molecule/metal junctions, based on linearly conjugated organic molecules.

Chemical synthesis, electro- and photo-chemistry and quantum chemical calculations will be deployed to develop understanding of molecular electronic structure as a function of redox state. This highly collaborative research program will create structures in which molecular electronic properties directly impact on the room temperature operating characteristics of the device. By providing both tools and chemical concepts that address the issues of molecule-surface interactions, charge transport across these interfaces, and function, we will advance the field of molecular electronics, increase the critical mass of activity in the area, and improve bilateral research capacity. Furthermore, the synergy between these two complementary facets (molecular photonics and electronics) will facilitate study of each topic in greater detail than in a project concerned with only one of these areas. This synergy is expected to foster more rapid strides towards realization of practical devices made from carbon-rich organometallics.

institutions and laboratories involved

France

  • Frederic Paul (DR CNRS, PI), UMR CNRS 6226 (ISCR-COrInt Team)
  • Jean-François Halet (DR CNRS, co-PI), UMR CNRS 6226 (ISCR- CTI Team)

The consortium of French researchers at Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes (ISCR).led by F. Paul and J.-F. Halet belongs to different groups and teams at ISCR. Besides the strong organic or organometallic chemical synthesis component which is shared by most French participants of ISCR (iron alkynyl complexes; porphyrins; organic chromophores and fluorophores), some team members bring more specific expertise in various physico-chemical fields (silicon surface functionalization and electrochemistry, mixed-valent compounds, second-order and third-order NLO studies). The latter are complemented by ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopic facilities at the Institute of Physics of Rennes (M. Lorenc, IPR). There is also a strong computational component present among the French delegates (led by J.-F. Halet and A. Boucekkine at ISCR), complemented by a specialist in excited-state calculations in Toulouse (I. Dixon, LCPQ-UPS).

Australia

  • M.G. Humphrey (Prof, PI), Research School of Chemistry,  ANU (Canberra)
  • P. J. Low (Prof, co-PI), School of Chemistry and Biochemistry  UWA (Perth)

The group of M. G. Humphrey at ANU in Canberra is fully equipped to study the nonlinear optical properties of molecules with Z-scan experiments for measuring cubic nonlinearities and optical limiting properties recently complemented by a hyper-Rayleigh scattering setup for measuring quadratic nonlinearities.

Laser suite for the study of nonlinear optical properties of molecules (Australian National University).

P. J. Low at UWA (School of Molecular Sciences) has leading expertise in intermolecular electron-transfer processes and molecular electronics. His group is equipped with a spectroscopic and experimental setup to characterize and study eletron-transfer processes through single molecules deposited on surfaces. This complements and extends the long-standing interest and expertise in the synthesis of metal-alkynyl and organometallic derivatives led by G. A. Koutsantonis.

SPM platform for electrochemical AFM/STM experiments (University of Western Australia).

Single molecule electronic studies and spectroelectrochemical facility (University of Western Australia).

International Exchanges

Participants of the Molecular Electronics and Photonics Meeting (MEP 2018), July 10-13, 2018, UR1)

Signing of the first French-Australian SCF-RACI kindred agreement (2018-2022) by the Presidents of SCF (G. Chambaud, left) and RACI (P. Junk, right).

G. A. Koutsantonis at the French-Australian Scientific Day (FASD 2019), April 2019, UR1 (left)

Docteur Honoris Causa nomination of M. G. Humphrey by UR1 (F. Paul left, F. Mongin Right).

Participants of French-Australian MC2R meeting (MCR2 2018), ANU, November 20, 2018.

Program of first French-Australian School on Molecular Electronics and Molecular Photonics (MEMP 2019), ANU, July 4-8, 2019.

IRP FOCOMAT

IRP FOCOMAT

French-Vietnamese International Research Project in New Composite Materials

IRP (LIA) FOCOMAT
2013
Contact:
Dr. Nadine Pébère
Nadine.Pebere@ensiacet.fr

Dr. Tran Dai Lam
tdlam@itt.vast.vn

IRP FOCOMAT
News

Introduction

The IRP (LIA) FOCOMAT “Functional Composite Material” (started in 2013 and renewed in 2017) is managed by Dr. Nadine Pébère (CIRIMAT) in France and Dr. Tran Dai Lam (VAST) in Vietnam.

Missions and research themes

The project aims at developing new composites materials (bulk or thin films systems). The scientific program is divided in three axes:

  1. Development of greener organic coatings
  2. Electrodeposited biomimetic apatite coatings
  3. Polymer composites with reinforcing plant fibers

1. Development of greener organic coatings

Organic coatings are widely used to prevent corrosion of metallic structures because they are easy to apply and cost effective. Corrosion inhibitors are incorporated in organic coatings to provide active corrosion protection. In the past, chromates were the most commonly used inhibitive pigments. However, due to their high toxicity, many studies have been devoted to the development of more environmentally acceptable organic coatings. In this context, our project aims to incorporate non-toxic corrosion inhibitors in organic coatings via natural clays (montmorillonite – MMT or layered double hydroxides – LDH), acting as nano-reservoirs for green inhibitors. The complementary effects of MMT and LDH on the microstructure of the coatings are investigated to search for synergistic effects by using different inhibitors. The study of the inhibitor leaching from the clays and their healing action in the case of damaged coatings will be specifically considered.

2. Biomimetic apatite coatings

A proper design of a bone implant material is aimed to provide the necessary durability, functionality, and biological response for long-term use. In this context, metallic materials, among which stainless steels, are most commonly implemented for load bearing implants. Durability and functionality of the implant are governed not only by the mechanical properties of the bulk material but also by the biological response, i.e. osteointegration that depends mainly on the surface/chemical characteristics of the implantable device. The challenges for electrodeposited coatings are twofold: (i) to be able to co-dope the apatite coating and to control the release kinetics and (ii) to produce coatings in lattices structures made from additive manufacturing (3D approaches), that is becoming the most usual method to produce the implants.

 3. Polymer composites with reinforcing plant fibers

The tailoring of polymer composites with long reinforcing plant fibers is a major issue of research in the domain of structural organic composite. The main advantage of such materials is weight saving. The other issue is to design recyclable materials. This explain that the choice must be restricted to linear polymers i.e. thermoplastics. Now, the difficult point is to be able to make the processing at a temperature that is sufficiently low for avoiding the degradation of the plant fiber. Finally, we focus on biosourced polymers. The reinforcing long fibers are bamboo fibers growing in North Vietnam: Dendrocalamus barbatus. The major interest of bamboo fiber is to possess the highest Young modulus among vegetal fibers. The first keys point is to define a treatment allowing the handling of the fiber during the processing of the composite. Moreover, it must allow a satisfactory interface with the polymeric matrix: the interfacial region is insuring the stress transfer from the matrix to the reinforcing fiber.

Some important dates for the collaboration on the topic “Corrosion and protection” 

November 1999: Do Son School “Corrosion protection”.

1997-2004: FSP “Espoir” Project (financial support for PhD thesis and for equipment).

2005-2012: Cooperation agreement VAST/CNRS “Corrosion and protection of materials”.

2013-2020: LIA “FOCOMAT”.

Organization of international Workshops on Corrosion and Protection of Materials in Hanoi: December 2012, October 2015, September 2018 and the next one planed in September 2020 (shifted in 2021, due to the Covid outbreak).

institutions and laboratories involved

France

  • Dr. Nadine Pébère, CIRIMAT Laboratory, Université de Toulouse

Vietnam

  • Dr. Tran Dai Lam, Director of the Institute of Tropical Technology (Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology) in Hanoi.

Participants to the Workshop CPM 2015, ITT, Hanoi

Participants to the Workshop CPM 2018, ITT, Hanoi

On November 29, 2019, Nadine Pébère received the Friendship Medal, awarded by the President of the Republic of Vietnam, Mr Nguyễn Phú Trọng, in recognition of her strong involvement in the collaboration between Vietnam and France for nearly 25 years.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. TRAN Tuan Anh – vice president of VAST – and Nadine Pébère

After the ceremony of the Friendship Medal.

IEA PseudoSPECS

IEA PseudoSPECS

French-Australian International Emerging Action in Chemistry

IEA ECHAPH
2020-2021
Contact:
Prof. Thierry Brousse
Thierry.brousse(at)univ-nantes.fr

Prof. Scott W. Donne
Scott.Donne(at)newcastle.edu.au

IEA PseudoSPECS logo

IEA PseudoSPECS
News

KxWO3 electrode materials: pseudocapacitance or battery-type behavior?

Introduction

The IEA PseudoSPECS project, is dedicated to the use of a newly developed method (Step Potential Electrochemical Spectroscopy-SPECS ) by our colleague Prof. Scott W. Donne from University of Newcastle (Australia) to unveil the pseudocapacitive behavior of electrode materials synthesized by Dr. Olivier Crosnier and Prof. Thierry Brousse (Université de Nantes, CNRS, Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, IMN, Nantes, France). Moreover, we target at coupling SPECS to in-situ or operando techniques (Mössbauer, XAS, XRD) used at IMN to clearly evaluate capacitive, pseudocapacitive and faradaic components of charge storage in these materials both from structural/chemical and electrochemical points of view.

IEA PseudoSPECS was initiated during the 6th International Symposium on Enhanced Electrochemical Capacitors (ISEECAP 2019) organized in May 2019 in Nantes where it first started 10 years ago. Prof. Scott W. Donne and Prof. Thierry Brousse and Olivier Crosnier discussed their results obtained on pseudocapacitive electrode materials using different techniques. SPECS results presented by the Australian partner were quite amazing compared to standard electrochemical techniques and both teams decided to apply for an International Emerging Action in Chemistry that was granted by INC-CNRS.

Missions and research themes

Nowadays, tremendous efforts are being made to improve the energy density of ECs without compromising either their power density or cycling ability. As such, pseudocapacitive materials, i.e. compounds whose peculiar charge storage mechanism involves surface and/or subsurface fast and reversible redox reactions, are of great interest in the field, as they allow reaching greater capacitance values than carbon materials, especially from a volumetric point of view. However, the nature of the electrochemical behavior of pseudocapacitive compounds is still under debate since only few experiments have confirmed its Faradaic origin. Thus, it has become a big challenge to get fundamental insights into the electrochemical phenomena occurring at/in pseudocapacitive electrodes while the cell is operated at a realistic cycling rate, i.e. within few seconds or few tens of seconds. Thus, using the recently developed SPECS technique, it is possible to examine separately the charge storage contributions from double layer capacitance and pseudo-capacitance.

Main OBJECTIVES OF THE PROJECT

In this project SPECS technique will be used to investigate the materials synthesized at IMN. This will enable the comparison of electrochemical results on new electrode materials in Nantes and Newcastle. Moreover, SPECS technique will be coupled with in-situ or/and operando spectroscopies (Mössbauer, XAS, or Raman) that have been set up in collaboration with other French labs belonging to RS2E network. This will definitely help to unveil charge storage mechanism in a wide variety of compounds from multicationic oxides to transition metal nitrides. The feedback from the different operando technique will also help to adapt the SPECS technique to different shapes of materials such as thin films, bulk electrodes, 3D microelectrodes.

institutions and laboratories involved

France

  • Prof. Thierry Brousse and Dr. Olivier Crosnier (Université de Nantes, CNRS, Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, IMN, Nantes, France).

Australia

  • Prof. Scott W. Donne (Department of Chemistry, University of Newcastle).

Discriminating pseudocapacitance, double layer capacitance and redox capacity: SPECS will help!

IEA Feuilles de Graphene

IEA Feuilles de Graphene

French-Vietnamese International Emerging Action in Chemistry

IEA Feuilles de Graphene
2019-2021
Contact:

Nadine Suppo-Essayem
nadine.essayem(at)ircelyon.univ-lyon1.fr

IEA Feuilles de graphene
News

Introduction

The IEAfeuilles de Graphene” deals with new opportunities in catalytic applications offered by graphene.

Missions and research themes

Missions and research themes

Main OBJECTIVES OF THE PROJECT

Graphene, a single-atom-thick two-dimensional (2d) material, has attracted enormous interest because of its great potential in electronics originating from its high electrical conductivity and unique electronic structure.

institutions and laboratories involved

France

  • Coordination : Nadine Suppo-Essayem, Chargée de recherches, Institut de Recherche sur la Catalyse et l’environnement de Lyon, CNRS, Lyon1

    Vietnam

  • Coordination : xxxxxxxx, Vietnam Institute for Industrial Chemistry