IEA NAMICO

French-Australian International Emerging Action on Engineering

IEA NAMICO
2018 – 2020
Contact:

Prof Stéphanie Giroux
stephanie.giroux@univ-lyon1.fr

Check out NAMICO latest results here: Namico_Results

Introduction

The IEA “NAMICO” (Natural and Mixed Convective mass transfer phenomena impacting solar building envelope performance in urban environment) is developed in partnership between the Centre d’Energétique et de Thermique de Lyon (CETHIL) UMR-CNRS 5008, Lyon, France, the University of New South Wales (School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering) and the University of Sydney. It addresses the comprehension and the mastering of ventilated solar components such as double-skin facades, hybrid Photovoltaic/Thermal collectors, Building integrated solar chimney, … that generate energy.

Missions and research themes

This IEA project focusses mainly on natural convective phenomena generated in open domains. The configuration studied experimentally and numerically is a single channel submitted to homogeneous and inhomogeneous Uniform Wall Flux (UWF) boundary conditions. Moreover, an indoor reduced scale solar chimney experimental test rig coupled to a cubic cavity (modelling a dwelling zone) has been set up in order to focus on the effect of radiation exchanges (wall to wall and fluid medium participating) on natural flow development which is conditioning the energy efficiency of such building integrated solar systems. 

Main OBJECTIVES OF THE PROJECT

The scientific project is focused on flow and heat transfer control, and addresses 3 main subtopics with both experimental and modelling approaches :

  • Laminar-Turbulent transition indicators
  • Impact of the external thermal stratification on a transitional natural convection flow
  • Impact of radiation on the natural convection flow

institutions and laboratories involved

France

  • Coordination : Associate Prof. Stéphanie GIROUX, CETHIL UMR-CNRS 5088 – Université de Lyon
  • LOCIE UMR CNRS 5271

Australia

  • Prof. Victoria TIMCHENKO, University of New South Wales (School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering)
  • University of Sydney

Time-averaged relative wall temperature show complex three-dimensional unsteady vortical structures

Composition of the reduced scale experimental appartus