IEA Elixir

French-Australian International Emerging Action in Chemistry

IEA ArGex
2018-2020
Contact:
Dr Grégoire Herzog
gregoire.herzog(at)univ-lorraine.fr

Prof Damien Arrigan
D.Arrigan(at)curtin.edu.au

IEA ELIXIR
News

Introduction

The IEA Elixir (International Emerging Action – Electrogeneration of inorganic materials at liquid-liquid nano-interfaces) is managed by Dr Grégoire Herzog (CNRS, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour les Matériaux et l’Environnement, Université de Lorraine) in collaboration with Prof Damien Arrigan (Curtin Institute for Functional Molecules & Interfaces, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University). The programme is effective from 2018 to 2020.

Missions and research themes

Crystallisation processes of solids from solution are of great importance in many natural and industrial processes., such as the manufacturing of pharmaceutical compounds and in the detrimental deposition of scale in pipes. The aim of the research is to explore a new method for the growth of crystalline materials by controlling interfacial reactions at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions.

Main projects of research

The focus of this work is based on the common interest of the Australian and French research groups for ion transfer processes at water-oil interfaces. Thanks to the application of a potential difference, we are able to push ions across the liquid-liquid interface. By this method, the mass transfer of ionic compounds is controlled to allow the investigation of crystallisation and growth phenomena. We have undertaken a systematic study of ionic crystallisation at water-oil interfaces to provide an easy way to prepare ionic crystal materials, based on the ability of electrochemistry to deliver ions to the crystallisation site.

The work is divided on

(i) the fabrication and the characterisation of nano-interfaces;
(ii) the electrogeneration of inorganic materials at the liquid-liquid interface;
(iii) the effect of confined spaces in these crystallisation processes.

institutions and laboratories involved

France
• Dr Grégoire Herzog (LCPME, CNRS-Université de Lorraine)

Australia
• Prof Damien WM Arrigan (Curtin University, Perth)